Tag Archive for books


The Monumental Trees of Italy

  Have you seen this book? Many years ago, I found this book while browsing the clearance stacks at a used bookstore in Washington, DC. Published in 1990, Gli Alberi Monumentali d’Italia is a beautiful coffee table book full of color photos of legendary trees from Italy’s islands and central/southern regions. Roman pines, Holm oaks, olive, cypress, sycamore, lime, beech,…

Smoke break, Milan (Flickr/vanz

Smoking in Italy

A lot of Italians still smoke. This is hardly a newsflash for many. I have always known that Italians are more relaxed (than Americans, for example) about smoking. But it is still a surprise coming from a culture where smoking is stigmatized to where it is not necessarily expected but accepted across many generations. Italy imposed a national smoking ban in…


LUXE City Guide RomeIf you consider yourself a stylish traveler, then you’ve probably already heard of LUXE City Guides. These handsome little guides give you the low-down on the chicest restaurants, bars, boutiques, and more in some of the world’s most happening cities. Now LUXE has announced its first foray into foreign language publishing with its guides in Italian. These guides are available for purchase online at http://www.luxecityguides.it and in bookshops throughout Italy.

Chances are, since you’re reading this blog, you prefer to get your Italy travel information in English. Luckily, to celebrate the launch of LUXE’s new Italian-language line, the publisher is offering 20% off of its Italy titles through June 30. You can snap up one of their guides to Rome, Florence, Venice, or Milan by ordering online at http://www.luxecityguides.com and entering LUXEITALY at checkout. (Note that this offer is available for worldwide shipping with the exception of Italy.)

Reading this post after June 30, 2011? Visit LUXE City Guides on Amazon.com.

Ancient Aphrodite Sculpture Back in Sicily

On Tuesday, the Museo Archeologico di Morgantina, a small archeological museum in Aidone (Enna), Sicily, held an inauguration for the repatriation of an ancient sculpture of Aphrodite. The stone deity, known in Italian as the Dea Morgantina, had been a prized possession of the Getty Museum in Los Angeles until L.A. Times journalists Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino uncovered that the Getty had illicitly acquired the Aphrodite and several dozen other ancient works of art that had been stolen from Italy and sold on the arts black market. This fascinating tale of the underbelly of the antiquities trade and the Getty’s role in the acquisition of looted art is the subject of Felch and Frammolino’s new book, “Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum.”

The Getty and many other top American museums are part of a long history of illicit art trade. Looted art has been trafficked for as long as art has been in existence, and Frammolino says this is due to the overpowering effects of antiquity.

“People who come in contact with antiquities — the history of it, the beauty of these antiquities, the thought that maybe somebody great had once possessed this — they lose reason”

[Listen to the full audio of the journalists’ interview with NPR’s Renee Montagne]

While Los Angeles and the Getty Museum may still be reeling over the loss of such an iconic statue, Aidone has been readying for the repatriation of the Morgantina for decades. The Morgantina museum has devoted a new room for the display of the Aphrodite, which will complement Demeter and Kore, two other looted-and-since-returned statues, and other artifacts unearthed from this area of Sicily which was once part of Magna Grecia (Greater Greece). Following is a short video (in Italian) which provides a comprehensive look at the Dea Morgantina and its new home.

Photo © AP/via NPR