An Invitation to Bloggers: A “Gift” From the Italy Blogging Roundtable

Many of you will know that, since May 2011, five of us have been writing a monthly post on a given topic and we call it the Italy Blogging Roundtable. Each month we decide the topic in advance and the only rule is that it has to be connected to Italy; the posts are published … Continue reading An Invitation to Bloggers: A “Gift” From the Italy Blogging Roundtable

From Foreign Language to Lingua Franca: Italian Immersion Programs in Italy

I have a confession. Despite having lived in Italy for nearly three years and having studied Italian off and on for a number of years, I have a long way to go before I can consider myself fully fluent in the language. There has been one time, however, when I felt really confident about my Italian … Continue reading From Foreign Language to Lingua Franca: Italian Immersion Programs in Italy

Five Favorite Flavors From Ferrara and Modena

To ring in the New Year, my family and I rented a farmhouse for a few days on the outskirts of Ferrara. Thinking back to the trip, the timing wasn’t ideal. Ferrara was freezing and on New Year’s Eve, the fog was so thick on our drive into town to watch the fireworks over Castello … Continue reading Five Favorite Flavors From Ferrara and Modena

The Man, the Myth, the Legend: Saint Valentine of Terni

Not many tourists make it to Terni. But many of those who do come to Umbria’s second largest town come specifically to see the church of Saint Valentine.

Ancient Ruins, Virtual Reality: Archaeological Sites Embrace VR For Enhanced Experiences

Last weekend the Domus Aurea, also known as Nero’s Golden Palace, became the latest attraction to offer visitors the chance to wear virtual reality headsets while touring the site.

More Than A Mocha: Torino’s Sweet, Rich Bicerin

You can visit Torino without tasting a Bicerin, but then you’d be going against the advice of noted gastronome Alexandre Dumas. The writer who was best known for his novels The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo was also publisher of L’Indipendente, a Neapolitan newspaper that supported Italian Unification, as well as the … Continue reading More Than A Mocha: Torino’s Sweet, Rich Bicerin

Italy’s Alpini Corps: The Traditions Beyond the Feathered Cap

The grey felt cap adorned with a black raven feather worn by old northern Italian men and some modern-day camouflaged troops is known as the Cappello Alpino. This recognizable cap signifies that the wearer is or was a member of the Alpini, an elite corps of the Italian army that is most closely associated with … Continue reading Italy’s Alpini Corps: The Traditions Beyond the Feathered Cap

Five Lessons Learned While Living and Traveling in Italy

Reflection is part of the prescription for moving from one year into the next. So while I wanted to write a year-end round-up a month ago, I realized that such an article would not fully capture the joys, sorrows, and idiosyncrasies of being an expat resident and traveler in Italy. Five is an arbitrary number, … Continue reading Five Lessons Learned While Living and Traveling in Italy

Before Considering a Move to Italy, Check Out This Quality of Life Index

Friends and family often ask me two questions about Italy: How do I move to Italy? If I move to Italy, where should I live?

A Little Greek / Yogurt in Paestum

If you tell a Roman that you are going Paestum for the weekend, invariably he or she will tell you: “Make sure you pick up some mozzarella di bufala.” Paestum is a sight to see without the culinary pit stop. A city known as “Poseidonia” when it was part of Magna Grecia, Paestum is home to … Continue reading A Little Greek / Yogurt in Paestum

A Special Harvest: Anatomical Theaters in Italy

Since ancient times, man has been interested in anatomy — how muscles and bones function and fit together and how the body works. But it wasn’t until the Renaissance that the study of anatomy really took off, thanks in large part to the printing press, which helped anatomists, illustrators, scientists, and physicians get on the … Continue reading A Special Harvest: Anatomical Theaters in Italy

Will Work For Wine: Luca Signorelli’s Orvieto Duomo Contract and His Intoxicating, Apocalyptic Fresco Cycle

In 1499, Tuscan artist Luca Signorelli signed a contract to paint two remaining sections of the Cappella Nuova (new chapel) of the Duomo in the Umbrian town of Orvieto. By 1502 (or 1504, depending on which documentation you read), he had completed his “End of the World” fresco cycle in what is now known as the … Continue reading Will Work For Wine: Luca Signorelli’s Orvieto Duomo Contract and His Intoxicating, Apocalyptic Fresco Cycle

In Rome, Communing Over Coffee

In the mornings after I’ve sent the kids off to school and tidied up the house I go down and have my morning cappuccino.

Visions of Veronese Green in Venice

When you are the parent of young kids, you often find unusual things in your pockets. After a while, you get used to sticking your hand in your coat and finding a toy car or an action figure. For the past several months, I’ve been carrying around an unopened tube of Veronese Green* paint. Back … Continue reading Visions of Veronese Green in Venice

Everything is Authentic

Trying to decide if a travel experience is authentic or not is like trying to separate “travelers” from “tourists.” That debate separates those who travel along class and age lines, with travelers proclaiming their experiences better, richer, more true than those of the tourists. There’s even a famous quote by G.K. Chesterton that delineates these … Continue reading Everything is Authentic

Lost in Translation: Ancient Stories in Art

The first time I realized that my obscure knowledge of Rome had really sunk in was in the early to mid-aughts. Friends of mine had returned from a family wedding in the Italian capital. Specifically, the ceremony had been held at San Silvestro in Capite. “That’s where they keep the reliquary of the head of … Continue reading Lost in Translation: Ancient Stories in Art

Rome Revisited: What Has and Hasn’t Changed

Rome is changing. Rome has changed. You hear those phrases around Rome all the time these days. Crime, corruption, unemployment, immigration, unreliable public transit, trash collection, the euro – Italy is in crisis and the prevailing mood among its citizens is one of resignation and exhaustion. This was most recently expressed cinematically with La Grande … Continue reading Rome Revisited: What Has and Hasn’t Changed

Thank You!

Thank you so much for donating to Italofile! Your donation means a lot. If you arrived here by accident, you can donate to my site by clicking the button below: [paypal-donation] Now, check out a few posts: Five Fabulous Art Works in Rome You May Have Missed The Hill Towns of Umbria: Part I and … Continue reading Thank You!

August in Italy: The Things You’ll Need

Don’t go to Italy in August! The prevailing travel wisdom about Italy has always been to avoid going to the country in August as it’s hot, many shops and restaurants are closed, and the cities are emptied out of residents and replaced by other tourists. All of this is quite true. But if August is … Continue reading August in Italy: The Things You’ll Need

Writer’s Block, Italian Style

This is what happens when you have writer’s block and you are supposed to write about Italy.